Revisiting the Harvard Classics: Day 1

I was struggling for a way to do these posts so I started out with the reading guide written by Dr. Eliot. Fifteen Minutes a Day took me through an assortment of early century adds and a lot of repeated gibberish about the books. In the end, Eliot promised that a person could get a college level education from just reading for fifteen minutes a day. Then I found the daily reading guide.
For 365 days there are suggested readings listed with a guide of what to look for in the text. Of course, this starts out in January and it is now July but I am going for numbers and not by the date, so I read the first listing and found it is from volume 1, the Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Franklin’s advise for the new year consisted of a list of 13 items that he wanted to improve upon himself. The last thing on the list was to be more like Jesus and Socrates, a bit ambitious if you ask me. Still he tried to keep with the project and in the end compared it to any other craft or hobby. You may want to have perfect handwriting and although you strive for it you will never be perfect. But because you attempted and tried to achieve that goal your legible handwriting is better than most. This is a common theme found it everything from art to martial arts. You may seek perfection but the pursuit is more important than the goal.
I had already read this book but going back again and reading the text and goals that Franklin set for himself reminded me of all the failed attempts to have new years resolutions. On the upside, if this man who is regarded as an American God could not keep up with his own goals than I don’t feel so bad not going to the gym.
Tomorrow we will see John Milton…

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