The Great Reset: Macro Reset

The following is part of a series about the book Covid-19: The Great Reset written by Klaus Schwab and Thierry Malleret. Some things to consider for this book, since the book has two authors it is unknown what information was added by which author.

  1. Interdependence

This section of the book compares aspects of society to boats. Each country at one time used to be their own boat but through globalization they became cabins on the same boat. Because of this independent ideology it is difficult to grasp the big picture and countries need to react to things like Covid-19 as if we are all on the same boat instead of trying to regulate what happens in our own cabins. This section made me question the movement towards populism and a desire that is growing in countries like isolationism. After all, if these countries had isolated or regulated travel as they wanted to before the Covid-19 outbreak would they have been affected like the rest of the planet? At what point are nations allowed to no longer participate in a global market or will they be forced to play along whether they like it or not?

In keeping with the boat analogy could one of the solutions to Covid-19 be isolationism and making a country a lifeboat away from the rest of the sinking ship?

  1. Velocity

With reference to our fast-paced society the argument is made that we already accept change and at a faster pace than before. More of the world is connected through the internet and we expect things faster and more immediate. As things become faster, we equate this with the fast pace of Covid-19 moving through the world even though it follows the same pattern as a bacterium populating a petri dish. Just like the end of the dish being filled so will the new policies of the Great Reset. A quote from Hemingway is used about being broke. At first, it’s a little at a time then its all at once. This is how the policies will be rolled out. We are already seeing this with the barrage of executive orders being signed by the Biden administration and policy changes in Canada and the UK.

  1. Complexity

The system of our society is a complex system that used specialized professions to keep things working. Because of these specialized positions it is difficult to see how one change in mortgages will affect the jobs market or college enrollment. The argument is made that nobody saw the financial collapse of 2008 coming and this is a flat out lie. Michael Ruppert warned people about what was coming two years before the housing bubble burst. Members of wall street took out credit default swaps on the mortgage bonds before they crumbled due to rising numbers of default mortgages. I saw it coming with the insane prices of houses while nobody had received a pay raise in three years. These things are not difficult to see coming and I’m tired of people who think they know better telling everyone afterwards there was no way to know.

In late march of 2020 my boss sat us down in the work room and asked what we could see next? What was coming after the lockdown? After a minute of silence I said, “civil unrest, famines, riots, societal collapse.” It wasn’t what people wanted to hear and so these voices go ignored and forgotten even after things happen. The people in charge say nobody knew to take some responsibility off their own shoulders leaving those that spoke up left out as crazies and undesirables.

Covid-19 is not a black swan event, but the consequences will be. It is not difficult to see the repercussions of Covid-19 on our society. This has been tracked since the beginning. The rise in suicide from the constant lockdowns, the closing of businesses, depression among kids, lack of trust in government and media. So far there are no consequences regarding Covid-19 that haven’t been seen. They are all driven by government policies and the results are easy to see or predict. Our government keeps printing money since tax revenue is not coming in, causing inflation and later a rise in interest rates which will make the federal government insolvent unless it prints more money to pay its bills. The balance books are too far to one side for the national debt to ever be paid back and there aren’t enough resources in the world to cover the damage. None of this is a black swan that nobody could have expected, it’s the obvious repercussions of poor management and credit card policies.

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