From the Cabin

1-21-2021 Vol 1 Issue 3

Politics: Joe Biden is now President. Three executive orders have been signed. One requires the mandatory wearing of mask on federal property. Another stopped the production of the Keystone pipeline from Canada and immediately resulted in the filing of a lawsuit against the federal government by the Canadian government.

During his last days in office Trump failed to signed pardons for Julian Assange and Edward Snowden. This decision came after Mitch McConnell told the president’s office that if a pardon was given to these individuals the senate would vote in favor of an impeachment against Trump after he was out of office.

Economics: Officially, for 2020, there was a 70% increase in the creation of money in the united states by the federal reserve. The dollar has currently lost somewhere between 15-20% of its value and the biggest sign of inflation so far is the cost of electronics that has dramatically risen in the previous months. On Amazon.com a $600 notebook had gone to $750 in the span of a week.

 Gold: $1,869.40 troy ounce

Silver: $25.98 troy ounce

Platinum: $1,132.40 troy ounce

Copper: $3.65 pound

Bitcoin: $32,650

US National Debt: $27,818,168,000,000

Debt per citizen: $84,044

Food: Seed companies have repeatedly shut down their websites due to the increased demand for seeds in the coming year. Many companies like Burpee have closed the order sections until they were able to find new suppliers to meet demand.

Self-defense: In a recent interview with the former chief of the CIA, John Brennan, it was stated that the new Biden administration is working to start mass surveillance on people they determine to be dangerous to the public. This list included white supremist, racists, bigots, libertarians, and Trump supporters. This focus is based on the belief that white terrorists are the biggest threat against the country.

Around the same time Katie Couric was a guest of Bill Maher, asking the question how Trump supporters were going to be reprogrammed into society?

Editorial: Planning the year 2021

There is no telling what 2021 will bring but considering where we were a year ago today, not knowing about lockdowns and small businesses being pushed to the curb, it is in our best interest to plan ahead for what might be coming our way. Back in march of 2020 I knew that one of the side effects of a pandemic is a shortage of food. I already had a seed bank and had learned how to grow an urban garden years before. Hunting is still a mystery to me depending on the animal. Squirrels, turkey, rabbit, and quail are fair game. Deer have taunted me for years. I have studied organic farming of which there are several styles. At the beginning of the lock down I made a run to tractor supply and bought 6 chickens. The homestead is coming along. Spring will be a busy time, building beds for the first time, plowing rows by hand, and fighting the deer who will be treating my garden like a feast. These are the things I am focusing on. This is the plan I am setting in motion. I would encourage anyone who is able to do something similar to do the same thing. Grow for yourself and your friends and family. Trade with neighbors. Learn to be a human again.

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